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Short-Acting Contraceptive Methods

Helping you find contraception to suit your needs

Short-Acting Contraceptive Methods

There are two different types of short acting methods: combined hormonal contraception or CHC and the progestogen-only pill or POP. CHC refers to methods that contain two hormones: the combined oral contraception, transdermal patch and vaginal ring.

Unlike LARC methods, these methods do require regular input, whether taking the pill daily, or changing the patch weekly or three weekly intervals with the vaginal ring.

Short-Acting Methods: Pill, Patch and Ring

Short-acting methods refer to methods that you need to remember to use or take regularly, or each time you have sex, such as the contraceptive pill and the condom.

While short-acting methods offer certain flexibility, their effectiveness rates are typically less than those of long-acting contraception, and this should be taken into consideration when deciding on a method.

Short-acting methods include barrier methods such as condoms, or hormonal methods such as the pill, patch or ring.

Watch this short video from Simphiwe Sesane, MSI Reproductive Choices UK's contraceptive nurse, who will tell you a little bit about short-acting methods.

 

Do you know about LARC contraceptive methods?

If you really don’t want to get pregnant, say for the next year at least, it’s worth thinking about a LARC method: LARC stands for long acting reversible contraception, such as the implant, coil and injection. Once these methods are fitted you can forget about them!

Types of Short-Acting methods

The Combined Pill

There are two types of contraceptive pill: the combined pill, and the progestogen-only pill, also known as the 'mini pill'.

The combined pill is a daily tablet that contains two hormones: progestogen and oestrogen.

The pill works well at preventing pregnancy. With typical use, up to 7 out of 100 users will become pregnant. However, its ability to stop a pregnancy largely depends on a person using it properly.

Read more about the Combined Pill.

The progestogen-only pill or the "mini-pill"

There are two types of contraceptive pill: the combined pill, and the progestogen-only pill, also known as the 'mini pill'.

The progestogen only pill, or "mini pill" is a daily tablet that contains one hormone: progestogen.

The pill works well at preventing pregnancy. With typical use, up to 7 out of 100 users will become pregnant. However, its ability to stop a pregnancy largely depends on a person using it properly.

Read more about the mini pill.

The Contraceptive Ring

The combined contraceptive vaginal ring is a small soft ring that you insert into your vagina. It contains two hormones, progestogen and oestrogen, similar to the hormones in your body.

The vaginal ring works well at preventing pregnancy. With typical use up to 7 out of 100 users will become pregnant. However, its ability to stop a pregnancy largely depends on a person using it properly.

Read more about the vaginal ring.

The Contraceptive Patch

The combined contraceptive patch is a small soft plaster patch that you stick on your skin. It contains two hormones, progestogen and oestrogen, similar to the hormones in your body.

The patch works well at preventing pregnancy. With typical use up to 7 out of 100 users will become pregnant. However, its ability to stop a pregnancy largely depends on a person using it properly.

Read more about the Patch.

The Female Condom

The female (internal) condom is a thin plastic and loose-fitting sheath that is places into and around the entrance of the vagina. Condoms are the only contraceptive method which protect against sexually transmitted infections (STIs).

The female condom works reasonably well at preventing pregnancy but its ability to stop a pregnancy largely depends it being used properly every time a couple has sex. This means it must be worn from the start to the finish of the sex act and a new one must be used for every sex act.

With typical use 21 out of 100 users will become pregnant.

Read more about the Female Condom.

The Male Condom

The male condom is a very thin rubber or plastic sheath that goes over the penis. It only needs to be used when you have sex. Condoms are the only contraceptive method which protect against sexually transmitted infections (STIs).

The male condom works reasonably well at preventing pregnancy, but its ability to stop a pregnancy largely depends on it being used properly every time you have sex. This means it must be worn from the start to the finish of the sex act, and a new one must be used for every sex act.

With typical use 13 out of 100 users will become pregnant.

Read more about the Male Condom.

Contact us if you have any questions

Remember that contraception counselling is part of your abortion treatment: we are here to help you find a method of contraception that best suits your individual needs.

MSI Reproductive Choices Services

We provide high-quality reproductive healthcare to people in England.

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